Background

In the run-up to this year’s conference “Shaping Access! More Responsibility for Cultural Heritage”, the “Hamburger Note” is going to be presented in Berlin. Archives, libraries and museums are faced with technical, administrative and judicial challenges when it comes to digitisation...

The first publication by the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek, “A Future for the Past – Cultural Heritage in a Digital World”, was published in March 2015.

The first publication of the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek entitled “Der Vergangenheit eine Zukunft – Kulturelles Erbe in der digitalen Welt” (“A Future for the Past – Cultural Heritage in a Digital World”) appeared in March 2015.

The anthology published by Paul Klimpel and Ellen Euler broaches the issue of tasks and framework conditions which commemorative institutions such as museums, libraries or archives face during the digitalisation of cultural heritage by featuring articles from various specialised authors.

To accompany the first publication by the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek, “A Future for the Past – Cultural Heritage in a Digital World”, photographer and film theorist Jürgen Keiper has produced an impressive series of photos showing the physical process of digitising material held in libraries and archives.

How can cultural resources – physical or digital books, files, films, artworks and such like – be allocated a distinct and permanent address so that the associated digital information can be located efficiently on the internet? At the “Mitten im Wandel” Colloquium for archiving processes and technology (24th-27th November 2014) a group of authors representing the German National Library, the

From 11-13 February, the EuropeanaTech conference was held at the National Library of France in Paris. During these two days, Joris Pekel, Europeana’s Community Coordinator for Cultural Heritage, interviewed a number of speakers attending the conference to learn more about their work and their vision for the future of digital cultural heritage. For the first in this series, he

From 11-13 February, the EuropeanaTech conference was held at the National Library of France in Paris. During these two days, Joris Pekel, Europeana’s Community Coordinator for Cultural Heritage, interviewed a number of speakers attending the conference to learn more about their work and their vision for the future of digital cultural heritage. For the first in this series, he

From 11-13 February 2015, the EuropeanaTech conference was held at the National Library of France in Paris. During the two days, Joris Pekel, Community Coordinator for Cultural Heritage, interviewed a number of speakers attending the conference to learn more about their work and their vision for the future of digital cultural heritage.

‘Technology transforms our world. In the last twenty years we have seen how all-pervasive digital technologies and their interlinking on the World Wide Web have brought about enormous changes in almost every area of life. Culture is not immune to these developments.


Archives, museums, libraries and scientific and conservational institutions alike are facing huge challenges. How are they to fulfil